Band of the Week Q&A: Lord Nelson talks Green Bar show this weekend

Lord Nelson, a band of five from Virginia, are playing Green Bar tonight, Feb. 9, at 10:30 p.m. The group's roots rock sounds spring from their southern guitar stylings and off kilter trombone-playing. Their tour is taking them to Tuscaloosa this weekend. The show is free and the doors open at 8 p.m. We chatted with Kai Crowe-Getty, one half of the brother pair that started the rock group, about touring memories, influences and the band's first trip to Alabama. 

How did Tuscaloosa find its way onto your touring schedule?

We’ve never been to Alabama before, but we’ve heard great things about the town. We hope to do some exploring in our off time, so hit us up with good things to check out while we are there for the day.

Tell me your story. How did things develop into what they are now with the band?

Lord Nelson started out as most bands do—a bunch of friends playing songs in an old house. From our early days, things have changed dramatically once we starting hitting the road, putting out records, and turning our passion into a way of life. 

What was the hardest part about starting a band?

The hardest part has to be juggling the constant flux of life and balancing home [versus] the road. It takes a certain disposition to be able to embrace the ups and downs, the unknowns, and find a way to make the best out of bad shows, van breakdowns, and keep a sense of humor through it all.

What's the most rewarding part?

The most rewarding part is the music. It has to be, or else everything else just doesn’t work. Getting to that magic place where we all lock in and find the perfect moment in a song, it is still the best feeling. Meeting people who are appreciative and support what we do, who buy a T shirt, who put us up, who pick us up. It’s always worth chasing.

Are there any particular memories that really stand out throughout your career?

From hanging out on phosphorescent beaches to snow-capped mountains, we’ve been very fortunate to see much of this country. I think it’s the late nights, talking with new friends, sharing the love of life and music. It all blends together to a living quilt, capturing all the moments.

What did you think you were going to be when you were little? Did that have any influence on who you are today?

I always thought I’d play music in some form. My father is a musician so I grew up with it part of my daily life. This is true for most of the band. So we owe our parents a great debt for showing the path towards a life in song.

What do you do when you're not performing?

When I’m not on the road, I take it pretty easy. Hang out at home, take the dog on walks, sleep as much as possible and use the quiet to let new songs find me. It’s a great contrast to the lights and sound of the road.

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